Monthly Archives: November 2014

Installing Citrix Receiver 13.1 in Ubuntu/Debian

The best thing with Citrix Receiver for Linux is that it exists. Apart from that it kind of sucks. Last days I have tried to install it on Xubuntu 14.10 and Debian 7.7, both 64-bit version.

The good thing is that for both Debian and Ubuntu the 64-bit deb-file is actually installable using “dpkg -i”, if you fix all dependencies. I did:

1) #dpkg --add-architecture i386
2) #apt-get update
3) #dpkg -i icaclient_13.1.0.285639_amd64.deb
  ... list of failed dependencies...
4) #dpkg -r icaclient
5) #apt-get install [all packages from (3)]
6) #dpkg -i icaclient_13.1.0.285639_amd64.deb

Step (1) and (2) only needed in Debian.

selfservice is hard to get to start from the start menu. And selfservice gets segmentation fault when OpenVPN is on (WTF?). So for now, I have given up on it.

npica.so is supposed to make the browser plugin work, but not much luck there (guess it is because I have a 64 bit browser). I deleted system-wide symbolic links to npica.so (do: find | grep npica.so in the root directory).

#rm /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/npica.so
#rm /usr/local/lib/netscape/plugins/npica.so

Then I could tell the Citrix portal that I do have the Receiver even though the browser does not recognize it, and as I launch an application I have choose to run it with wfica.sh (the good old way).

keyboard settings can no longer be made in the GUI but you have to edit your ~/.ICAClient/wfclient.ini file. The following makes Swedish keyboard work for me:

KeyboardLayout = SWEDISH
KeyboardMappingFile = linux.kbd
KeyboardDescription = Automatic (User Profile)
KeyboardType=(Default)

The problem is, when you fix the file, you need to restart all Citrix-related processes for the new settings to apply. If you feel you got the settings right but no success, just restart your computer. I wasted too much time thinking I had killed all processes, and thinking my wfclient.ini-file was bad, when a simple restart fixed it.

Debian on NUC and boot problems

I got a NUC (D54250WYKH) that I installed Debian 7.7 on.

Advice: First update the NUC “BIOS”.

  1. Download from Intel
  2. Put on USB memory
  3. Put USB memory in NUC
  4. Start NUC, Press F7 to upgrade BIOS

If I had done this first I would have saved some time and some reading about EFI stuff I don’t want to know anyway. A few more conclusions follow.

EFI requires a special little EFI-partition. Debian will set it up automatically for you, unless you are an expert and choose manual partitioning, of course 😉 That would also have saved me some time.

(X)Ubuntu 14.10 had no problems even without upgrading BIOS.

The NUC is very nice! In case it is not clear: there is space for both an mSATA drive and a 2.5′ drive in my model. In fact, I think there is also space for an extra extra small mSATA drive. Unless building a gaming computer I believe NUC (or similar) is the way to go.

Finally, Debian 7.7 comes with Linux 3.2 kernel which has old audio drivers that produce bad audio quality. I learnt about Debian backports and currently run Linux 3.16 with Debian 7.7 and I have perfect audio now.